How Microtasking Can Stop Overwhelm and Improve Productivity

Posted by Jennifer Suarez onFebruary07,2018

 

Time management comes naturally to some people. Others, not so much. If you feel you’re in that second category, here is one thing I discovered lately that has helped a lot: microtasking.


This discovery is due to my husband, who goes into our home office every night for about 10 minutes. I asked him about it, and he said he’s taking care of one or two small tasks each night for personal projects.


Ding! Insert lightbulb over head here. Work has been very busy lately; I have not had time to devote to a personal project — my podcast — at the tail end of work hours as I sometimes do. But once I am home, it’s the whirlwind of playing with my child, dinner, and bedtime routine. Once that’s all done, I’ve usually run out of juice and want to spend what little time remains before bedtime doing something relaxing. Plus, I felt like my podcast needed large blocks of time so I could make progress.


Nope! Instead, I am microtasking. I am now working on one task per day. For example, I had on my list to swap out the logo on my social media pages for my new one. That took only a few minutes. Check. One evening, I sent one email to a potential guest. Check.


It’s the old adage, “Eat the elephant one bite at a time.”


I’d love to get several things done on this at once, but it’s not possible. By microtasking, I can slowly chip away at it. This helps:

  • Stop my overwhelm - I know things are always moving forward, even if it’s slowly, and that I will get it done.

  • Improve productivity - By checking tasks off my list one at a time, I am making progress. If I had just waited until I had both the time and the energy to manage a bunch of things at once, I’d be waiting for at least a week.


Janice and I have both talked about the folly of multi-tasking. Your focus will be far better if you focus on one single task at a time. However, sometimes the problem is just that you haven’t even had time to do a single task. If you’ve been neglecting a project for awhile, try breaking it into bite-sized pieces. How can microtasking help you?

 

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